Sunday, December 1, 2013

HOT TO TROT



QL2 Dance
Artistic Director: Ruth Osborne
Gorman House, 23 to 24 November 2013

Review by Len Power

Now in its 15th year, QL2 Dance’s, ‘Hot To Trot’, showcases the work of their dancers who have stepped into the role of choreographer.  Artistic Director, Ruth Osborne, explains that ‘it is not only a chance for them to develop ideas and create movement. These choreographers need to take responsibility for their dancers’ well-being, source costumes and music, consider lighting design, write program notes and work to a timeline that has their piece rehearsed and performance ready in time.’

This year, nine items were presented of which three were films.  All were well-realized works, notable for their imaginative concepts and content and nicely danced by all participants.  There was also a thoughtful integration of lighting, sound and music and an understanding that works can entertain as well as inform.

It isn’t possible here to mention every item in detail but the following were especially impressive.

 ‘Yurai’, a film by choreographer Luke Fryer, showed a strong mastery of the medium, creating an interesting choreography in the flow of the film itself.  Luke’s use of perspective, jump cutting, slow motion and composition within the frame were very impressive.

Alana Stenning’s, ‘Primadonna’, was a clever and entertaining work that used her group of dancers very well, creating strong and entertaining images to make her point about narcissism.  ‘Inter-dependence’, a second work by Luke Fryer and danced live was especially witty and nicely choreographed.  His dancers Alex Abbot and Kyra-Lee Hansen gave assured and witty performances that received a delighted response from the audience.

Choreographed by Kyra-Lee Hansen and Jack Riley who also danced the piece, ‘Hear no evil, see no evil’, explored the idea of how we dance when we are by ourselves compared to when we are being watched.  This was an exciting piece with complex but clear choreography and strong dancing, both individually and especially together.

The final piece, Scatterbrain’, choreographed by Amanda Lee, was a delightful depiction of unconnected ideas and thoughts that race through a choreographer’s mind when developing a work.  It was very entertaining as well as being nicely danced.

As well as the fine dancing, it’s the imagination of these young choreographers that is so impressive in ‘Hot To Trot’.  Do yourself a favour and make sure you see it next year!

Originally broadcast on Artsound FM 92.7 ‘Dress Circle’ on Sunday 1 December 2013.

1 comment:

  1. Interesting that I don't think anyone made it to my exhibition earlier this year which focused on the landscape of the ACT region and used augmented technology. Does the Critic's Circle just work within the established networks of ANU School of art - Yawn!!

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